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of antigovernment protesters have renewed their marches in cairo and other cities. they've there have been a number of clashes with security forces who have been firing tear gas and water canners. but after more than a week of unrest, president morsi has issued a statement saying those behind the violence will be held politically accountability -- accountable. >> flashes on the doorstep of the presidential palace. the fires from the cocktails thrown, a message to muhammad morsi. the people feel betrayed. the revolution was supposed to turn egypt into a country where everyone prospered. and where there was justice. for these people who gathered earlier in their new regular friday rituals, reform is coming far too slowly. >> we're back to another demonstration in tahrir square. of course piece people feel passionately about wanting to change things. there are many, many egyptians who feel demonstrations like this are counterproductive and need to stop. ahmed is one of those who feel that after so many decades of dictatorship, the new president needs more time to fix things. >> right nouts not the rig
fell on the city of chelyabinsk-- population over a million-- about a thousand miles due west of moscow on the edge of the ural mountains. the strike shocked and stunned the world. more than 1,000 people were injured. paul davies of independent television news begins our coverage. >> reporter: emerging from the russian sky, a giant ball of flame, a meteorite providing a spectacular show until it suddenly explodes 30 miles above the earth. the city of chelyabinsk was unlucky to be beneath the meteorites flight path and was showered with debris dropping from the sky. thousands of windows were smashed, shocked workers evacuated their offices. this school class is about to be interrupted by the shock wave. here the windows come crashing in, and a national judo squad runs for cover. canadian ice hockey star michael garnett plays for the chelyabinsk team and lives in the city. i was awakened by this loud bang, crash and shaking in my apartment that, you know, literally shook me out of bed. i kind of gathered myself and looked out the window and i saw this giant streak across the sky that was
violence is till going on. on capitol hill in state houses in city halls and in gritty political campaigns the discussion about gun violence is going strong. >> they say it isn't about guns. they're wrong! it is about guns. [applause] let me say at the outset to all the press -- no law abiding citizen in the united states of america has any fear that their constitutional rights will be infringed in any way. none, zero. >> i don't think washington politicians trying to score political points should be taking away a fundamental individual right, a right the supreme court has said every law abiding american is guaranteed by the bill of rights. gwen: as part of our pbs initiative, after newtown, we turn now to an assessment to where the debate stands. molly, is the policy debate different this time? >> it feels very different. as we just saw, we had the vice president just this week speaking in connecticut making sure to use that white house bully bull pit to keep this -- bully pulpit to keep this discussion going. you had the president's former campaign apparatus now known as organizing for a
traits come easily for students who have grown up in the city's roughest neighborhoods where they have already developed an inner strength remarkable for their age. >> often times those skill sets are not point pointed as assets. often times kids think that they walk into this environment with liabilities. we think it's completely opposite. >> reporter: once the students move on to college they stay in regular contact with their one goal teacher through their first year. the aim is not just to get kids into college but to equip them with the support system they need to finish. >> we've seen 20, 25 years of education reform in the united states. almost all of it has been directed in prek through 12 which has -- so we see that proliferation of charter schools we've seen early childhood interventions work, we've seen human capital providers, we've seen big city mayors like rahm emanuel take over education yet almost none of it has spread to higher education. so our country has begun to get college access right but we see huge dropout rates in college. >> reporter: cynthia barren is a coac
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)